Category Archives: Teaching Philosophy

The Ultimate Utility of Nonutility

Forget trying to measure learning. The greatest value of the liberal arts can be that students start to understand the complexity, confusion, and contradiction at the heart of human experience. From the wonderful journal of the AAUP, Academe : Lisa … Continue reading

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Thoughts on Improving College Education

As a professor, here is my humble take: The K-12 system needs to improve; too many students arrive in college without the skills needed to complete college work. Both primary and secondary educational advisers need to do a much better … Continue reading

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“Over-parenting” as Narcissism

Saw an old but still interesting article on Time.com today: The Growing Backlash Against Overparenting about how children are being overly coddled by “helicopter parents.” FTA: “in the 1990s something dramatic happened, and the needle went way past the red … Continue reading

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Defining Academic Freedom

From Cary Nelson, AAUP President: Over the course of decades, a great many books, essays, and policies have been written and published about academic freedom. We have learned how to apply it to pedagogical, technological, cultural, and political realities that … Continue reading

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First They Came for the Undergraduates

Reposted from AAUP Online, an electronic newsletter of the American Association of University Professors. Driving from Jackson State University in Mississippi last April, I passed a sign, “Mississippi: Birthplace of American Music,” as a blues program played on the radio. … Continue reading

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